Oh, hello! Welcome to Goodfilms

We are different.

We believe that sometimes critics get it wrong, and the flops can be a lot of fun in the right moment.

Rate, review, and share the films you love and the films you love to hate and we'll make sure you've always got something to keep you glued to the screen.

Let's get you started.

Get started on Goodfilms by signing in using Facebook, Twitter or Netflix.

Austin over 5 years ago
A little bit hokey and silly, but still genuinely entertaining.
Jonathan Evans over 5 years ago
The tale of JJ is sad, slow, quiet and at times hard to watch. But that's the beauty of it
Mike Faulkner 6 years ago
Great movie! again & again!
Matteo Satta 12 months ago
M over 2 years ago
Matt almost 3 years ago
Commons over 4 years ago
Marlene over 4 years ago
Nerd Girl almost 5 years ago
Becky over 5 years ago
Michael Morris over 5 years ago
Michael over 5 years ago
Matt Scandalis over 6 years ago
Jeremiah Johnson is a 1972 western film directed by Sydney Pollack and starring Robert Redford as the title character and Will Geer as "Bear Claw" Chris Lapp. The film has been said to have been based in part on the life of the legendary mountain man Liver-Eating Johnson, based on Raymond Thorp and Robert Bunker's book Crow Killer: The Saga of Liver-Eating Johnson and Vardis Fisher's Mountain Man. The script was written by John Milius and Edward Anhalt; the film was shot at various locations in Redford's adopted home state of Utah. It was entered into the 1972 Cannes Film Festival. A jaded veteran of the Mexican War (1846-48), Jeremiah Johnson (Robert Redford) seeks solace and refuge in the West. He aims to take up the life of a mountain man, supporting himself in the Rocky Mountains as a trapper. His first winter in the mountain country is a difficult one; he has a brief run in with Paints-His-Shirt-Red, a chief of the Crow tribe, who observes a starving Johnson futilely fishing by...
Read more on External IMDB External Wikipedia

Related:

  • 18
    11
    0
  • 2
    1
    0
  • 11
    24
    0
  • 23
    20
    2
  • 16
    19
    2
  • 25
    46
    6